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Measurements

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My husband and I recently started working out at home. I re-took my measurements, and realized I had lost 3/4” in my bust, 1 1/4” in my waist, and 1 3/4” in my hips since my last measurements were taken a little over a year prior. As I’m still figuring out pattern manipulation and drafting, I figured this was a good opportunity for me to practice making new slopers. In this post, I’ve given my measurements, as well as provided the measurement chart I use. 

My measurements

Below are my new measurements, listed in both inches and cm:

#MEASUREMENT TYPEMEASUREMENT (INCHES)MEASUREMENT (CM)
1Back width16″40.6
2Shoulder line5″12.7
3Back length16″40.6
4Front length18″45.7
5Bust depth11 3/4″29.8
6Bust point to bust point9 1/2″24.1
7Upper bust circumference35 1/4″89.5
8Bust circumference36 3/8″92.4
9Bra cup size36C (underwire size 38)
10Under bust circumference30 1/4″76.8
11Waist circumference29 3/4″75.6
12Hip circumference39 1/4″99.7
13Hip depth (front)
Hip depth (side)
7 3/4″
10 1/2″
19.7
26.7
14Waist to ankle44″111.8
15Waist to knee24 3/4″62.9
16Crotch depth10 1/2”26.7
17Bicep circumference10 7/8″27.6
18Elbow circumference11″27.9
19Wrist circumference6 1/2″16.5
20Shoulder cup length5″12.7
21Bicep depth6 1/8″15.5
22Elbow depth13 3/4″34.9
23Arm length24 1/4″61.6
24Under arm length19 1/2″49.5
Measurements as of 05/30/2021

Why I have both metric and imperial measurements

I have a few thoughts on why the metric system (cm) is superior to the imperial system (inches). I came to this conclusion after I had my measurements taken, which was done in inches. Therefore, I simply converted those inches into cm. I like to have both because I know inches well, and can visualize their measurement. On the other hand, cm are much easier to divide, and I don’t have to deal with complicated fractions (like 29/32…?).

Women’s measurement chart

I have seen many measurement charts around, and I knew I had to make my own. Typically, other charts include measurements I don’t use, and I didn’t want to constantly cross them out. Also, I wanted everything to flow, to make it easier when I’m actually taking the measurements and drafting the patterns. Below, I’ve included the current chart I use. It is the best I have as of now, but could be updated at any time.

Conclusion

Part of the reason I’ve shared my measurements is so I can reference it whenever I need to. Also, it may be useful for some to understand the types of measurements I am working with, perhaps to better understand the types of adjustments I make to patterns. I’ve found it helpful to see other people’s real measurements, so maybe this can help someone else.

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